Book Review: Primed by the Past (Fiction; Barbara Speake)

Primed by the Past 110I’m a bit behind in my reviews of other Indie authors, but am happy to get back in the saddle with this recommendation of the first book in Barbara Speake’s three book (to date) series describing the adventures of Annie Macpherson, a young Scots detective just beginning to make her way in the world of crime.

Primed by the Past introduces us to a young woman who is as smart and professional in her work as she is believable and well-centered in her private life. Although we are told that Macpherson was born and raised in Scotland, the story finds her working in Connecticut on an exchange program that introduces her to interesting co-workers as well as a sadistic killer. The author is obviously well acquainted with the genre and pulls it off nicely with a smooth flow and no dead spots. The narrative is brisk, the characters are convincing, the ending ties back beautifully into the plot’s development, and just about no one will see it coming. What more could you want?

If you like a good detective story that revolves around characters that seem like real people instead of genre stereotypes, this is the book for you.

Primed by the Past is available at Amazon in eBook and paperback editions in the U.K. here and at the U.S. site here, although it looks like there’s a problem with the paperback edition at the U.S. site at the moment  (only over-priced, used copies are listed as available). In the U.S., the eBook version is only $0.99, and free for KindleUnlimited Subscribers so the price of taking a test drive with the work of this able new Indie author is modest indeed.  Why not give one of her titles a try?

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About Andrew Updegrove

I'm a cybersecurity thriller author/attorney that has been representing technology companies for more than thirty years. I work with many of the organizations seeking to thwart cyber-attacks before they occur.
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